In the end, Favre proves to be exactly what we thought he was

Lights please

Signing Brett Favre is the perfect example of something that seems like a good idea at the time, but you have to know you’re going to have to pay the piper at some point. He can win you a lot of games, but when it comes down to it, he’s eventually going to kill you.

The Jets found that out last year when Favre badly injured his bicep to the point where he probably shouldn’t have been playing any more, but refused to sit out – his consecutive-game streak that nobody cares about may have had something to do with it. And he had two touchdowns and nine interceptions in his final five games, four of them losses, as the Jets missed a seemingly sure shot at the playoffs after starting out 8-3.

And the Vikings found out this year – for a while, everything’s gravy when you have Favre. But for all his regular-season success and gaudy statistics, he somehow got into a power struggle with his coach, casting a pallor over the end of the season. And then, just like two years ago, his final throw was a horrible interception when he had all sorts of running room ahead of him.

(Don’t get me wrong, the 12-men-on-the-field penalty was the true killer there, as it forced Favre to try to do too much in that spot. I have no idea how it’s even possible to do that on offense. But Favre’s miscue is formulaic for him at this point, so it’s valid to bring it up.)

Speaking of which, Favre has a history of terrible timing in that regard, which this site does a better job of highlighting than I could. I understand Favre is a legend and all that, a sure-fire Hall of Famer, but if his Packers had played a better team than the Patriots in Super Bowl 31, he might not have the one Super Bowl championship that prevents him from going from flawed to tragically flawed.

Honestly, after all this time, what rubs people the wrong way with Favre is the dog and pony show that goes on every year with his muddled non-retirement that his ego helps perpetuate. Even the staunchest critic would admit he can still play at a high level, but if he couldn’t make a Super Bowl with this team – with all sorts of offensive weapons and a staunch defense – what team could you put him on and have him not suck the wind out of everything, and then fail in the end?

I’m now hearing that the Vikings would go after Donovan McNabb if Favre retired. I’ll go you one better and say that they’d take McNabb over Favre in a heartbeat. I realize McNabb hasn’t won a Super Bowl and Favre has, but the former fits much better as a versatile player who desperately needs a change of location.

I do think Favre will decide to come back. But though he did play brilliantly beyond dispute this season, was it worth the punishment, the burning of an enormous bridge with the Packers, and another late-season disappointment? There’s only one result that could matter for Favre at this point, and that’s reaching the Super Bowl.

Considering the fact that he has won a ring over the course of his career, maybe now is the right time for Favre to give up his quixotic quest and release any prospective team from the burden of thinking that signing him can work out in the end. The expectations are just too high to match up with what he can deliver at this point.

Esoteric

2 Comments

  1. For what it's worth, I read that the 12-man penalty was on the coaches. They had changed some personnel for a certain package or play, and the fullback who would normally have been in on that formation was switched out for a second tight end. When one of the coaches saw the FB on the sidelines, he said, “Aren't you supposed to be in there!?” So the FB ran out to the huddle. Then the Saints sideline saw that there were 12 men there, and got the call.

    I don't see Favre going anywhere but Minnesota. He's got a two-year deal, and I figure he knows what he's got there, so if he wants yet another last shot at the Super Bowl, why not stick with the team that was two plays away? I just hope he makes a decision soon and sticks with it.

  2. For what it's worth, I read that the 12-man penalty was on the coaches. They had changed some personnel for a certain package or play, and the fullback who would normally have been in on that formation was switched out for a second tight end. When one of the coaches saw the FB on the sidelines, he said, “Aren't you supposed to be in there!?” So the FB ran out to the huddle. Then the Saints sideline saw that there were 12 men there, and got the call.

    I don't see Favre going anywhere but Minnesota. He's got a two-year deal, and I figure he knows what he's got there, so if he wants yet another last shot at the Super Bowl, why not stick with the team that was two plays away? I just hope he makes a decision soon and sticks with it.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.